Today a bank changed its name and here is how it is advertised

What happens when you don’t have anything to say but boss wants you to say something?

A front page ad in today’s national newspaper (Dawn) tells us that Arif Habib Bank has been renamed as Summit Bank. Why, how and benefits of this name change are as follows: (straight from the ad, I am not making this up)

We mean innovative banking and we’re committed.

With a team of most experienced bankers, Arif Habib Bank has changed to Summit Bank. The change stands for growth, which has equipped us with more values, more expertise and more solutions. Our core philosophy is based on better service, profound integrity, sold trust and greater stability assuring all our customers to enjoy a unique banking experience; because we are committed to you.

And to make it easier for you to understand the ad:

Why:

We mean innovative banking and we’re committed.

How:

With a team of most experienced bankers. (Can’t stop laughing … )

Benefits of name change:

The change stands for growth, which has equipped us with more values, more expertise and more solutions. (Drum roll please…. dum, dum, dum ….)

To be fair, this is not a lone example; it just caught my attention. Mission statements, quality claims, customer benefit statements, marketing literature, consultant reports and websites in corporate world are full of such meaningless language.

This ad could be worded like this:

Arif Habib Bank has changed its name to Summit Bank. Everything else is same.

But perhaps boss was not happy with a single line which did not depict bank’s corporate culture “accurately”.

Scott Adams writes in his book “The Dilbert Principle”:

Any business school professor will tell you that the objective of business communication is the clear transfer of information. That’s why professors rarely succeed in business. đŸ™‚

Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fajalar/1832785156/

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Umair says:

    Agreed. Mission statements are usually wordy sentences that don’t really mean anything.

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